Today, modern enterprise is rushing head first into an always-on, digital-centric, mobile world. Organizations that fail to modify their approach to technology will be left by the wayside as others incorporate highly flexible and scalable architectures that adapt quickly and efficiently to the demands of the modern marketplace.

The rapid rise in popularity of microservices was driven by these market influences. In just a few short years, companies have implemented various configurations of technologies to offer the best user experience.

Challenges with Migrating

One of the primary challenges when considering migrating to microservices is that monolithic legacy systems cannot be changed overnight. DevOps and IT managers must decide where and when they can incorporate microservices into their existing applications.

  • Client Tier: The delivery of customer experience through mobile clients and the Internet of Things.
  • Delivery Tier: Optimizes user experience by device while personalizing content by monitoring user actions.
  • Aggregation Tier: Aggregates data from the services tier while performing data protocol translation.
  • Services Tier: The portfolio of external services such as Twilio and Box, as well as existing data, services, and record systems already in-house.

Perhaps the biggest difference with this new approach is the separation of the client tier. With this model, the layers underneath are constantly changing based on real-time interaction with users.

Entering the New Era of Computing

This new era of computing is based on ultra-fast data processing. Events are monitored, analyzed and processed as they happen. We can make timely decisions based on this continually updated flow of data, resulting in better service for clients, improved operations and instant monitoring of business performance against predetermined targets.

Microservices are not a panacea. There are potential drawbacks such as code duplication, mismatch of interfaces, operations overhead and the challenge of continuous testing of multiple systems. However, the benefits of creating loosely coupled components by independent teams using a variety of languages and tools far outweigh the disadvantages. In our current computing environment, speed and flexibility are the keys to success — microservices deliver both.